Thousands of people in Louisiana have a camp, or they are luck enough to know someone who will invite them to their camp to relax, fish and maybe have an adult beverage or two.

A Lafayette man got more than he bargained for from the "wildlife" at his camp.

Barbara Fruge of Lafayette told KPLC that her husband Steve got West Nile Virus after spending several weeks at their camp in Hackberry.

Imagine all of the sudden you get a really high fever, and you can't walk correctly.

State epidemiologist Dr. Rauol Ratard has stated over the years that most people who contract West Nile virus never feel a thing, but if you get the more severe form, the neuroinvasive type it can lead to several complications including neurological problems and in some cases death.

In the middle of those situations, some people may end up feeling like they have an extreme case of the flu.

Barbara told the TV station that her husband is improving each day, but that her 63-year-old husband is dealing with some neurological issues and weakness in his body.

When Fruge was diagnosed it marked the first time that West Nile Virus was recorded in Lafayette this year.

Lafayette Consolidated Government's contracted mosquito abatement experts remind you to never leave any standing water on your property as that is the perfect breading ground for mosquitoes.

They also recommend if you are going to be outside for any extended period of time that you wear an insect repellant that contains DEET which is known to fight off the bugs.

For those of you that do not enjoy wearing mosquito repellant, click here for a natural way to fight the bite.

The most active times for mosquitoes is at sunrise and sunset each day, and so it's recommended that you keep that in mind when you are making your plans each day.

Officials also recommend wearing loose long sleeved shirts and long pants if you do have to be outside which can tend to be tough in Louisiana's sweltering heat.

Three people have died this year from contracting West Nile Virus, and of those people who have tested positive for the disease, ten of the people had no symptoms, eighteen of the people had the milder form and thirty-nine people have had to battle the neuroinvasive form.

The total cases across the state this year stands at sixty-seven.